Prostate cancer

Prostate Cancer has a high incidence rate and a long development period, both in its growth phase and in the progression of the illness. There are numerous risk factors which are known in the development of prostate cancer, including age, geographical area and race. There are also pre-cancerous lesions which can be diagnosed and analysed medically.

In the majority of men with pre-existing micro focal illnesses, the growth of a prostate cancer is inhibited while some other men it is stimulated. It seems highly probable that these differences are only rarely due to genetic factors. Of the studies carried out on immigrants in the United States coming from countries with a low incidence of prostate cancer, like Japan or China, it has been shown that the incidence of prostate cancer increases by 3-7 times, indicating that environmental factors are a determining key to the development of the illness.

Of the environmental factors retained decisive in the development of prostate cancer, nutrition is the one suspected to play the largest role. In North America and Northern Europe, obesity and a diet containing a high level of animal fats are common, while in Asia the diet is rich in fibre and Soya protein, which contains Fitoestrogens and a low content of animal fats.

In Italy, prostate cancer is the first cancer that hits men, with an incidence of 12%, surpassing lung cancer which is around 10%. Every year in Italy 42,804 prostate cancers are registered with 9070 fatalities (statistics from The Epidemiological Cancer Department – The National Epidemiological Centre, Surveillance and Promotion of Health – The Superior Institute of Health 2005). Nearly 23000 new cases are discovered every year, 20% of which have already entered the metastasis phase. Given that the average age of the Italian male population is ever-increasingly higher, the incidence of prostate cancer can only worsen, seeing as age is one of the main known risk factors. At the moment there are over 9,300,000 men over 50 years of age in Italy, who are potentially at risk. The fundamental principle in reducing the danger is the attention and sensibility to prevention, exactly as with other forms of cancer with high incidence rates, such as breast cancer. Unfortunately the statistics show us that men are much more reluctant than women to regularly undertake measures for prevention and pre-emptive diagnosis. According to one study, only 22% of Italian men from 50 to 70 years of age are aware of the significance of the PSA test, one of the main diagnostical instruments in the fight against prostate cancer. This percentage rises to 48% in the United States. Only 13% of European men undergo the PSA test.

In Italy, incidence of prostate cancer is increasing but survival rates are falling, with a noticeable difference in comparison to other more advanced European countries. In Italy 47.4% of affected men survive prostate cancer, compared to 54.5% in Spain, 61.4% in France and 71.4% in Switzerland.

Incidence is really high in North America and Northern Europe ( 63 X 100,000 white men and 102 X 100,000 Afro-Americans) in the United States, but very low in Asia (10 X 100,000 men in Japan). According to the American Cancer Society in 2008 in the United States nearly 186,320 new cases were diagnosed with nearly 28,660 fatalities. 680,000 men around the world are struck by prostate cancer every year. 220,000 die from prostate cancer. Prostate Cancer

Prostate Cancer has a high incidence rate and a long development period, both in its growth phase and in the progression of the illness. There are numerous risk factors which are known in the development of prostate cancer, including age, geographical area and race. There are also pre-cancerous lesions which can be diagnosed and analysed medically.

In the majority of men with pre-existing micro focal illnesses, the growth of a prostate cancer is inhibited while some other men it is stimulated. It seems highly probable that these differences are only rarely due to genetic factors. Of the studies carried out on immigrants in the United States coming from countries with a low incidence of prostate cancer, like Japan or China, it has been shown that the incidence of prostate cancer increases by 3-7 times, indicating that environmental factors are a determining key to the development of the illness.

Of the environmental factors retained decisive in the development of prostate cancer, nutrition is the one suspected to play the largest role. In North America and Northern Europe, obesity and a diet containing a high level of animal fats are common, while in Asia the diet is rich in fibre and Soya protein, which contains Fitoestrogens and a low content of animal fats.

In Italy, prostate cancer is the first cancer that hits men, with an incidence of 12%, surpassing lung cancer which is around 10%. Every year in Italy 42,804 prostate cancers are registered with 9070 fatalities (statistics from The Epidemiological Cancer Department – The National Epidemiological Centre, Surveillance and Promotion of Health – The Superior Institute of Health 2005). Nearly 23000 new cases are discovered every year, 20% of which have already entered the metastasis phase. Given that the average age of the Italian male population is ever-increasingly higher, the incidence of prostate cancer can only worsen, seeing as age is one of the main known risk factors. At the moment there are over 9,300,000 men over 50 years of age in Italy, who are potentially at risk. The fundamental principle in reducing the danger is the attention and sensibility to prevention, exactly as with other forms of cancer with high incidence rates, such as breast cancer. Unfortunately the statistics show us that men are much more reluctant than women to regularly undertake measures for prevention and pre-emptive diagnosis. According to one study, only 22% of Italian men from 50 to 70 years of age are aware of the significance of the PSA test, one of the main diagnostical instruments in the fight against prostate cancer. This percentage rises to 48% in the United States. Only 13% of European men undergo the PSA test.

In Italy, incidence of prostate cancer is increasing but survival rates are falling, with a noticeable difference in comparison to other more advanced European countries. In Italy 47.4% of affected men survive prostate cancer, compared to 54.5% in Spain, 61.4% in France and 71.4% in Switzerland.

Incidence is really high in North America and Northern Europe ( 63 X 100,000 white men and 102 X 100,000 Afro-Americans) in the United States, but very low in Asia (10 X 100,000 men in Japan). According to the American Cancer Society in 2008 in the United States nearly 186,320 new cases were diagnosed with nearly 28,660 fatalities. 680,000 men around the world are struck by prostate cancer every year. 220,000 die from prostate cancer.